Developmentally, these child caretakers have shown certain positive associations that affect their future resilience in the face of adversity. Caring for disabled parents raises their sense of responsibility and maturity, increases social and life skills, fosters closer parent-child relationships, and enhances a child’s early sense of purpose. Children caring for sick or disabled parents also experience less anxiety surrounding their parents compared to children who have an additional caregiver for their disabled parent. This is because the children understand more about the illness and feel more in control over the situation.[21]

This is just the tip of the iceberg for how a mother’s physical presence is necessary for a child to have his best start in life, and it tapers off only gradually over some 15-20 years. In another example, their mother’s heartbeat, smell, and voice comfort and secure small children in a strange, harsh world that takes them a lifetime to begin to understand. Studies show that children’s stress levels immediately drop when they are suffering, just upon hearing their mother’s voice. Hearing mom is as good as a hug, and can actually help sick children heal faster.
Compliance Review and Enforcement.  The United States may review KinderCare’s compliance with this Agreement or title III of the ADA at any time.  If the United States believes that this Agreement or any portion of it has been violated, it will raise its concerns with KinderCare and the parties will attempt to resolve the concerns in good faith.  If the parties are unable to reach a satisfactory resolution of the issue(s) raised within thirty (30) days of the date that the United States provides notice to KinderCare, the United States may institute a civil action against KinderCare in the appropriate United States District Court to enforce this Agreement or title III of the ADA.  https://www.youtube.com/embed/eeCahRCgOfI
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